Is your body deficient in these vitamins?

I often get asked if supplements are good for you. My response is that taking supplements is not a free-pass to neglect your diet. A solid, healthy, clean diet filled with fruits and veggies and clean proteins and grains like brown rice, quinoa and oats are your first source of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. And then come the supplements.

When it comes to supplements - the vast majority of multivitamins and supplements are made from synthetic chemicals. Why? Because it’s cheap. These synthetic vitamins create confusion in your body as it doesn’t know what to do with them. Your body cannot use synthetic vitamins. When you’re body cannot identify and digest the ‘chemical’ vitamins it winds up eliminating them. Which is a waste of your money and your good intentions!

Some vitamins are bound to harmful substances as is the case with a cheap form of B-12 - cyanocobalamin. Cyanocobalamin is a chemical that isn’t found in nature. The B12 is bound to a cyanide molecule, which is a poisonous substance. Your body then has to eliminate this poison, which would be ok if your liver wasn’t already working overtime removing environmental toxins and chemicals from your food. All the more reason to know what’s in your vitamins!

You want to look for vitamins that come from organic food sources and that are in their active forms. There are several common vitamin and mineral deficiencies. They are:

  1. Vitamin B12 - a very common deficiency with symptoms ranging from lethargy, anxiety and depression to dementia/alzheimer’s-like symptoms. How to deal with this deficiency? Take B12 in the form of sublingual methylcobalamin.

  2. Magnesium - most people do not get an adequate amount of this mineral from their diet and as a result migraines, constipation, cramping, hypertension, insulin resistance may be commonplace to them. The best food sources of magnesium are leafy greens, like swiss chard and spinach, nuts and seeds, raw cacao and 70% dark chocolate and halibut. Supplements should be in chelated form - meaning its chemical name ends in -ate (glycinate, citrate, taurate), as these are best absorbed.

  3. Iron - some symptoms of iron deficiency are fatigue and weakness, decreased immune function, poor work/school performance and an inflamed tongue. Food sources of iron are organic, grass fed lean red meat, chicken and fish, lentils and beans. Menstruating women should take 18mg/day. Males/Males over 51 and post-menopausal Females  - 8mg/day.  

  4. Zinc - deficiency in this mineral is more common than one may think. Some symptoms are hair loss, slow wound healing, lower alertness, loss of appetite and reduced fertility. Get your zinc from oysters, grass fed red meat, pumpkin seeds, eggs, beans and nuts. Women should get 8mg/day. Men 11mg/day. Just 2 oysters a day fills your daily zinc quota!

  5. Iodine - best sources of this mineral are ocean fish, seaweed, shrimp and other seafood. Those deficient in this mineral can have brittle nails, cold hand/feet, poor concentration, lethargy and unexplained weight gain to name a few symptoms. 150 mcg/day if you’re going to take it in supplement form.  

  6. Vitamin C - Some excellent food sources of C are broccoli, green peppers, citrus fruits, tomatoes, kiwis, strawberries and guavas. Symptoms of deficiency include fatigue, inflammation of the gums, loose teeth, joint pain and poor wound healing. It is important for your vitamin C supplement to be naturally derived. Look for your vitamin C to be from berries or veggies. If you see a chemical name on the ingredients list it is synthetic.

  7. Vitamin D - the sunshine vitamin! 10-15 minutes of sunshine a day could help get your body’s full of this vitamin but there are other factors to consider. Vitamin D is most commonly found in fatty fish like salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel and fish liver oils. Some common symptoms of deficiency are depression and mood swings, lowered immunity, low energy and fatigue, muscle pain and weak bones. The best supplement form of this vitamin is D3.

Remember, first go for eating a healthy, well-rounded diet free of hormones, artificial-anything, chemicals and processed foods and full of fresh fruits and veggies, lean proteins and real, whole grains like oats, brown rice and quinoa. And then fill in the gaps with high quality supplements, as needed.  

If you found this post helpful, feel free to share it with your friends and share your progress too! & if you’re up for it - schedule a Self-discovery Session with me at https://www.timetrade.com/book/B6X4N

Who Doesn't Want GOOD Hair??

I’m a little impatient. I’ll admit it. But I think you’ll agree; if you had hair down the length of your back and then went all bob-y on it, you’d be impatient for it to get back to its former glory too! So I’ve been focused on eating foods that encourage long, luxurious growth. I’m taking full advantage of the fact that hair grows faster during the warmer months of the year and I am helping it along with my diet.

There are many factors that play a role in thinning hair and hair loss, such as genetics, hormonal imbalances, an under-active thyroid, nutritional deficiencies and poor scalp circulation. Thankfully, all of these can be resolved with proper nutrition.
What do you need for healthy hair??

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  1. Essential Fatty Acids - these are essential for your body and to promote healthy hair growth. (They are also good for your brain) Try adding flaxseeds, almonds, walnuts, coldwater fish such as salmon and mackerel, chia seeds and avocados to your meals.

  2. Vitamin C to boost Collagen Production - collagen surrounds our strands of hair and as we get ‘older’ it starts to break down, so eat foods high in vitamin C like all kinds of berries, citrus fruits, guavas, dark green leafy veggies like kale, broccoli, tomatoes and organic papayas.

  3. Iron-rich foods are essential for healthy hair and for healthy blood and circulation. Eat dark leafy greens like swiss chard and spinach, seafood like oysters, clams and mussels, beans and lentils, grass-fed beef and lamb, squash and pumpkin seeds and liver.

  4. Foods rich in zinc - are excellent for a healthy immune system and for building proteins and your hair, is made of protein! Look to add cooked oysters and crab, grass-fed beef (lean short ribs) and lamb, spinach, beans, pumpkin and squash seeds and raw cacao (or organic 70% dark chocolate) to your diet.

The other thing you can do is take high-quality supplements to encourage hair growth. I have been taking a high-quality, natural vitamin C and vitamin B. By ‘natural’ I mean the vitamins are from organic plant and herb sources. Synthetic vitamins are a waste of money because your body cannot use lab-created chemicals. The Synergy Company has an amazing lineup. I use their Superfood and Berry Powder, as well as their vitamins C and B. I am not a consultant for them - I just have done my research and tried their products and love what I’ve seen. A high-quality Biotin and Silica supplement is also good for, not only, your hair, but also your skin and nails.

The results from my initiative?? My hair is growing FAST and I often get asked if it’s ‘real’ - to which I proudly respond “Absolutely”! (I even invite them to cop a feel!) If you want to look like you have a good set of extensions, eat clean and healthy!  

If you found this post helpful, feel free to share it with your friends and share your progress too! & if you’re up for it - schedule a Self-discovery Session with me at https://www.timetrade.com/book/B6X4N


Get Glowing Skin!

There are days when I look at my skin and I can notice every little line and when the unevenness makes me think about what I’ve been up to over the last day or so. I know when I reflect I often realize that I didn’t eat as clean and well as I usually do and/or I didn’t get adequate sleep. So I have to get back on the proverbial horse. It’s not easy to be on top of your eating and sleeping habits but if you stay on it, you’ll have more and more days when you wake and admire the glow and smoothness of your skin. In terms of the foods we eat, not all of them are created equal in their ability to rejuvenate and beautify our skin. I won’t go into my anti-sugar tirade.. suffice to say it causes wrinkles and a host of other chronic illnesses. But I will share with you the foods that increase collagen production, fight off sun damage, reverse dryness and reduce redness/inflammation.

  1. For skin redness/blotchiness, add Flaxseeds, either whole or ground, to your diet. Flax is loaded with Omega-3s, B vitamins, zinc and folic acid. These nutrients are essential for healthy skin.

  2. Suffer from dry skin? Eat wild salmon, mackerel, artic char and herring 3-4 times a week; cold water fish are rich in Omega-3s.

  3. Signs of sun-damage? Add tomatoes, sunflower seeds and almonds to your diet; tomatoes are rich in lycopene which helps you skin resist the effects of the sun’s UV rays and the vitamin E in sunflower seeds and almonds also protect the skin from free radicals caused by UV rays.

  4. For fine lines, wrinkles and sagging skin, help your body increase collagen production by eating foods rich in vitamin-C like guavas, yellow and red peppers, broccoli, kiwis, kale, strawberries, mangoes, pineapples and oranges.

   Between the nuts and seeds, the cold-water fish and the abundance of organic fruit and veggies there should also be plenty of water! Hydration is essential in order to help our bodies get rid of impurities. You don’t want them to make themselves known ON your skin. At the end of the day, you can spend hundreds of dollars on quality, expensive creams (which I admit I do) but if you don’t nourish your skin with the right foods it will be a huge waste of money. Bottom line?? Invest in yourself!! In your body! You only get ONE!!

A few other tips to take your skin and body to the next level of beauty and health:

  • Eliminate processed foods

  • Cut dairy out of your diet

  • Eliminate wheat/gluten

  • Stop eating sugar

I know these few things are probably the toughest things anyone can do. I’ve done them. I know how hard it is. You will feel so much better once you kick the habit though! Start with baby steps like making half your plate veggies at lunch and dinner. Raw is good. Steamed or Sauteed. Just get your half a plate of veggies in! Then you can move on to reducing your intake of one of the categories listed. Remember that easy does it. Start by noticing how much of it you eat and then start reducing it incrementally. Be patient and stick to it. Treat your body with kindness during the process and you’ll see how your skin glows and is more supple. AND you will lose inches and pounds too! Health & wellbeing will be a part of your day to day too! It’s a win-win, on so many levels…

If you found this post helpful, feel free to share it with your friends! Write me with any questions or just to let me know how you’re progressing! Or you can schedule a Self-discovery Session with me at https://www.timetrade.com/book/B6X4N